We think it's important to share our findings

Our research is published in peer-reviewed journals, books, and conference proceedings

Publications

SEE-IT – A Social, Economic and Envinomnental Impact Analysis Tool for Age-Friendly Environments in Europe

Authors

Bond, R.,Ferri, M., Staalduinen, WH., Hinkema, MJ., Garces, J.

Published in

A protocol report from the AFE-INNOVNET project

Type

Report

Year

2015

Older Men as Learners - Irish Men’s Sheds as an Intervention

Authors

Carragher, L & Golding, B

Published in

Adult Education Quarterly

Type

Journal

Year

2015

To date, little attention has been placed on older men (aged 50+ years) as learners, with much of the literature on adult learning concerned with younger age-groups and issues around gender equity directed mainly at women. This article examines the impact of community-based men’s sheds on informal and nonformal learning by older men in Ireland. It considers older men’s attitudes to learning, learning behavior, and the noncognitive attributes—motivation, perseverance, and beliefs about capabilities—that underpin learning behavior. This descriptive study used a mixed-methods approach, involving questionnaires and focus groups, with all sheds registered with the Irish Men’s Sheds Association invited to participate. It is concluded that men’s sheds provide space for hands-on learning activities that add value to the lives and experiences of men beyond work, fostering a yearning to carry on learning. Crucially, shed-based conversations have an important role in helping older men with difficult life transitions and are an important site for future studies of masculinity in later life.

Older adults attitudes to self-management of health and wellness through smart home data

Authors

Doyle, J., Caprani, N., Bond, R.

Published in

Pervasive Health

Type

Conference

Year

2015

Smart homes have significant potential to enhance the lives of older adults, extending the period of healthy ageing, through monitoring wellbeing, detecting decline and applying interventions to prevent or slow down this decline. In this paper we present results from interviews with 7 older adults who have been living in smart homes for over 4 years. Our aims were to 1) examine attitudes to living with sensors and AAL technology over time; 2) gather opinions on the usefulness of this data for supporting self-management of health and wellbeing and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of various visualization techniques for presenting sensor-based health and wellness data. Our findings show that older adults are interested in receiving feedback from sensor technology to support them self-managing their wellbeing. Potential beneficial information includes time spent inside and outside the home, walking time, sleep, activity, blood pressure and weight. This information needs to be enhanced by education and goal-setting and by representing data using visualisations that are simple and intuitive.

Informal learning through Irish men’s sheds - the company of men

Authors

Carragher, L & Golding, Barry

Published in

The Adult Learner

Type

Journal

Year

Under Review

Despite a growing older population and evidence of the benefits of learning for well-being, little is known about older men’s experiences of learning, the factors that influence whether they choose to engage in learning activities and what role learning plays in their lives as they grow older. The present study examined the attitudes and learning behaviours of older men participating in men’s sheds in Ireland. Our findings point to the importance of men’s sheds as sites of informal learning that encourage the sharing of skills, knowledge and wisdom of older men. We conclude that men’s sheds facilitate sensitive conversations between older men as they actively engage in constructing masculine behaviours and identities in later life.

HAIVISIO

Authors

Bond, R., Ceinos, C., Mountzi, V.

Published in

HAIVISIO Research Projects Reference Framework

Type

Report

Year

2015