We think it's important to share our findings

Our research is published in peer-reviewed journals, books, and conference proceedings

Publications

Effect of a dual task on quantitative Timed up and Go performance in community-dwelling older adults - A preliminary study

Authors

Smith, E., Walsh, L., Doyle, J., Blake, C.

Published in

Geriatrics and Gerontology International

Type

Journal

Year

2016

What have women got to do with men’s sheds?

Authors

Foley, A., Carragher, L & Golding, B

Published in

Journal of Gender Studies

Type

Journal

Year

forthcoming

This paper proposes the introduction of a gender perspective in explaining the rapid growth of men’s sheds—a theoretical perspective that has been missing in the debate about older men and informal learning in the community. Gender relations have an important role in explaining the development of community education in Ireland, but it is a critical and neglected process in explaining learning transitions by older men. We also present empirical findings for a national study of men’s sheds in Ireland together with qualitative data from interviews with older women involved in men’s sheds in Ireland.

The Reliability Of The Quantitative Timed Up And Go Test

Authors

Erin Smith, Lorcan Walsh, Julie Doyle, Catherine Blake

Published in

Gait and Posture, 43

Type

Journal

Year

2015

The timed up and go (TUG) test is a commonly used assessment in older people with variations including the addition of a motor or cognitive dual-task, however in high functioning older adults it is more difficult to assess change. The quantified TUG (QTUG) uses inertial sensors to detect test and gait parameters during the test. If it is to be used in the longitudinal assessment of older adults, it is important that we know which parameters are reliable and under which conditions. This study aims to examine the relative reliability of the QTUG over five consecutive days under single, motor and cognitive dual-task conditions. Twelve community dwelling older adults (10 females, mean age 74.17 (3.88)) performed the QTUG under three conditions for five consecutive days. The relative reliability of each of the gait parameters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC 3,1) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Five of the measures demonstrated excellent reliability (ICC>0.70) under all three conditions (time to complete test, walk time, number of gait cycles, number of steps and return from turn time). Measures of variability and turn derived parameters demonstrated weak reliability under all three conditions (ICC=0.05-0.49). For the most reliable parameters under single-task conditions, the addition of a cognitive task resulted in a reduction in reliability suggesting caution when interpreting results under these conditions. Certain sensor derived parameters during the QTUG test may provide an additional resource in the longitudinal assessment of older people and earlier identification of falls risk.

The Loss of Social Network as a Precipitant of Bereavement Related Loneliness - Experiences of Older Adults

Authors

McConville, C., Carragher, L., McEvoy

Published in

Journal of Social and Personal Relationships

Type

Journal

Year

Under Review

This study investigated the views of a group of older Irish adults on the issue of loneliness, which is an individual’s negative interpretation of their social environment. The study sought to obtain participants’ views about the characteristics of loneliness, precipitating factors, and coping strategies of older people who have experienced loneliness. Of particular interest was the impact of the availability and/or loss of social connections and how this is interpreted by older persons within a loneliness context. Three focus group interviews were held with twelve older adults. Results showed loneliness to be a wholly negative experience, characterised by stigma and perceived as an unavoidable part of the ageing process. The reduction of the social network through bereavement was identified as a major contributing factor to the onset of loneliness, with aspects such as the loss of opportunity to share memories and an awareness of anticipated future loss highlighted as issues of particular concern for older people.

Stigma and dementia - Let’s talk about memory loss

Authors

Carragher L

Published in

Dementia

Type

Journal

Year

Under Review