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Our research is published in peer-reviewed journals, books, and conference proceedings

NetwellCASALA Publications

Continuous Real-world Gait Monitoring in Community-based Older Adults

Authors Published in Type Year
Walsh, L., Doyle, J., Smith, E., Inomata, A. and Bond, R. EMBC 2015 Conference 2015

This paper describes the collection of real-world gait in a cohort of 7 community living older adults, who have fallen at least once in the previous year, while they live in a smart apartment for four days. It describes the approach used to collect various gait metrics, from inertial sensors placed on the lower shanks, where gait bouts can be contextualised by smart home data. Results from this study are presented with a brief discussion into the smart home based contextualisation of outliers in the gait data. Future work will investigate the normative ranges of various gait metrics, and how such real-world gait data may be integrated into clinical practice.

Designing Stress Management Interventions for Older Adults to Improve Wellbeing

Authors Published in Type Year
Wilson, M., Doyle, J. and McTaggart, G. British HCI 2015 Conference 2015

We are experiencing an increase in the number of older adults. This presents both challenges and opportunities in the field of HCI research in terms of health self-management technology. This paper presents on-going work to design a mobile application that supports older adults in managing stress and sleep. The aim is to explore if sensor technology and a tablet application can be used to present intuitive feedback on stress levels and sleeping patterns with a view to reducing stress, improving sleep quality and increasing health and well-being overall.

Exploring healthcare professionals’ preferences for visualising sensor data

Authors Published in Type Year
Caprani, N., Doyle, J., Komaba, Y., Inomata, A. British HCI 2015 Conference 2015

Monitoring technologies and sensors have huge potential to support elderly people live independently at home. Providing healthcare professionals with access to sensor data displaying a patient’s activities and health vitals could deliver numerous benefits, including allowing continuous care, presenting positive/negative trends which HCPs can act upon, or alerting to immediate problems. This paper presents three phases of early-stage research from a larger study, which is concerned with investigating how sensor technologies can be utilised to facilitate frail elderly people transition from hospital to home. The focus of the research discussed in this paper is to explore health care professionals preferences for using and visualising sensor data.

Community men’s sheds and informal learning

Authors Published in Type Year
Golding, B. & Carragher, L. Private worlds(s) Gender and informal learning of adults Book chapter 2015

This chapter explores some of the gendered aspects of learning that have been recognised through the creation of the community men’s sheds movement during the past decade in four countries. It includes a new critical exploration of women’s historic and current role in the community men’s shed movement across four nations to 2014.

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Older adults’ attitudes to self-management of health and wellness through smart home data

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J., Caprani, N., Bond, R. Pervasive Health 2015 Conference 2015

Smart homes have significant potential to enhance the lives of older adults, extending the period of healthy ageing, through monitoring wellbeing, detecting decline and applying interventions to prevent or slow down this decline. In this paper we present results from interviews with 7 older adults who have been living in smart homes for over 4 years. Our aims were to 1) examine attitudes to living with sensors and AAL technology over time; 2) gather opinions on the usefulness of this data for supporting self-management of health and wellbeing and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of various visualization techniques for presenting sensor-based health and wellness data. Our findings show that older adults are interested in receiving feedback from sensor technology to support them self-managing their wellbeing. Potential beneficial information includes time spent inside and outside the home, walking time, sleep, activity, blood pressure and weight. This information needs to be enhanced by education and goal-setting and by representing data using visualisations that are simple and intuitive.

Older Men as Learners: Irish Men’s Sheds as an Intervention

Authors Published in Type Year
Carragher, L & Golding, Barry Adult Education Quarterly Journal 2015

To date, little attention has been placed on older men (aged 50+ years) as learners, with much of the literature on adult learning concerned with younger age-groups and issues around gender equity directed mainly at women. This article examines the impact of community-based men’s sheds on informal and nonformal learning by older men in Ireland. It considers older men’s attitudes to learning, learning behavior, and the noncognitive attributes—motivation, perseverance, and beliefs about capabilities—that underpin learning behavior. This descriptive study used a mixed-methods approach, involving questionnaires and focus groups, with all sheds registered with the Irish Men’s Sheds Association invited to participate. It is concluded that men’s sheds provide space for hands-on learning activities that add value to the lives and experiences of men beyond work, fostering a yearning to carry on learning. Crucially, shed-based conversations have an important role in helping older men with difficult life transitions and are an important site for future studies of masculinity in later life.

What have women got to do with men’s sheds?

Authors Published in Type Year
Foley, A., Carragher, L & Golding, B Journal of Gender Studies Journal forthcoming

This paper proposes the introduction of a gender perspective in explaining the rapid growth of men’s sheds—a theoretical perspective that has been missing in the debate about older men and informal learning in the community.  Gender relations have an important role in explaining the development of community education in Ireland, but it is a critical and neglected process in explaining learning transitions by older men. We also present empirical findings for a national study of men’s sheds in Ireland together with qualitative data from interviews with older women  involved in men’s sheds in Ireland.

Stigma and dementia. Let’s talk about memory loss

Authors Published in Type Year
Carragher L Dementia Journal under review

The Loss of Social Network as a Precipitant of Bereavement Related Loneliness: Experiences of Older Adults

Authors Published in Type Year
McConville, C., Carragher, L., McEvoy Journal of Social and Personal Relationships Journal under review

This study investigated the views of a group of older Irish adults on the issue of loneliness, which is an individual’s negative interpretation of their social environment. The study sought to obtain participants’ views about the characteristics of loneliness, precipitating factors, and coping strategies of older people who have experienced loneliness.   Of particular interest was the impact of the availability and/or loss of social connections and how this is interpreted by older persons within a loneliness context.  Three focus group interviews were held with twelve older adults.  Results showed loneliness to be a wholly negative experience, characterised by stigma and perceived as an unavoidable part of the ageing process.  The reduction of the social network through bereavement was identified as a major contributing factor to the onset of loneliness, with aspects such as the loss of opportunity to share memories and an awareness of anticipated future loss highlighted as issues of particular concern for older people.

Informal learning through Irish men’s sheds: the company of men

Authors Published in Type Year
Carragher, L & Golding, Barry The Adult Learner: The Irish Journal of Adult and Community Education Journal under review

Despite a growing older population and evidence of the benefits of learning for well-being, little is known about older men’s experiences of learning, the factors that influence whether they choose to engage in learning activities and what role learning plays in their lives as they grow older. The present study examined the attitudes and learning behaviours of older men participating in men’s sheds in Ireland. Our findings point to the importance of men’s sheds as sites of informal learning that encourage the sharing of skills, knowledge and wisdom of older men. We conclude that men’s sheds facilitate sensitive conversations between older men as they actively engage in constructing masculine behaviours and identities in later life.

SEE-IT – A Social, Economic and Envinomnental Impact Analysis Tool for Age-Friendly Environments in Europe

Authors Published in Type Year
Bond, R.,Ferri, M., Staalduinen, WH., Hinkema, MJ., Garces, J. A protocol report from the AFE-INNOVNET project Report 2015

HAIVISIO

Authors Published in Type Year
Bond, R., Ceinos, C., Mountzi, V. HAIVISIO Research Projects Reference Framework. Report 2015

Inferring health metrics from ambient smart home data

Authors Published in Type Year
Walsh, L., Kealy, A.,  Loane, J., Doyle, J. and Bond, R. IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine Conference 2014

As the population ages, smart home technology and applications are expected to support older adults to age in place and reduce the associated economic and societal burden. This paper describes a study where the relationship between ambient sensors, permanently deployed as part of smart aware apartments, and clinically validated health questionnaires is investigated. 27 sets of ambient data were taken from a 28 day block from 13 participants all of whom were over 60 years old. Features derived from ambient sensor data were found to be significantly correlated to measures of anxiety, sleep quality, depression, loneliness, cognition, quality of life and independent living skills (IADL). Subsequently, linear discriminant analysis was shown to predict participants suffering from increased anxiety and loneliness with a high accuracy (≥70%). While the number of participants is small, this study reports that objective ambient features may be used to infer clinically validated health metrics. Such findings may be used to inform interventions for active and healthy ageing.

Real-world gyroscope-based gait event detection and gait feature extraction

Authors Published in Type Year
Fraccaro, P., Walsh, L., Doyle, J. and O’Sullivan, D. eTELEMED 2014 Conference 2014

Falls in older adults are a major clinical problem often resulting in serious injury. The costly nature of clinic-based testing for the propensity of falling and a move towards homebased care and monitoring of older adults has led to research in wearable sensing technologies for identifying fall-related parameters from activities of daily living. This paper discusses the development of two algorithms for identifying periods of walking (gait events) and extracting characteristic patterns for each gait event (gait features) with a view to identifying the propensity to fall in older adults. In this paper, we present an evaluation of the algorithms involving a small real-world dataset collected from healthy adults in an uncontrolled environment. 92.5% of gait events were extracted from lower leg gyroscope data from 5 healthy adults (total duration of 33 hours) and over 95% of the gait characteristic points were identified in this data. A user interface to aid clinicians review gait features from walking events captured over multiple days is also proposed. The work presents initial steps in the development of a platform for monitoring patients within their daily routine in uncontrolled environments to inform clinical decision-making related to falls.

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Independent Living Technologies

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J. & Walsh, L. Introduction to Nursing Informatics Book chapter 2014

Countries globally have been experiencing an unprecedented increase in the number of older adults. As a result there has been an elevated interest in understanding the factors that may support the maintenance of independent living and quality of life of older adults. There is a large role for innovative technology to support monitoring, early detection and management of health and wellbeing in the home. Most diagnostic and treatment approaches to health are centred in clinical settings, and very few have focused on improving the self-management of wellbeing using novel in-home, ICT (information communication technology) based intervention systems. Utilizing combinations of ambient sensor data acquisition, telehealth and ICT it is possible to predict changes in wellbeing, and to deliver feedback and interventions to support personal wellness management.

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Wellness Self-Management in Older Populations

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J. NordiCHI Workshop on Designing Selfcare for Everyday Life Conference 2014

This position paper describes ongoing work in the design and evaluation of a self-care application for older adults to support general wellness. We report on findings from a 5- month field study with 7 participants, which provided rich insights and a greater understanding into older adults’ attitudes and behaviours in relation to wellbeing selfmanagement. We highlight case studies of two participants - one of whom embraced the application and continued to use it beyond the trial period, and one who dropped out of the trial early, indicating some reasons behind both.

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Men’s learning in Ireland

Authors Published in Type Year
Carragher, L., Evoy, J., & Mark, R. Men learning through life Book chapter 2014

Men learning through life seeks to identify new, practical and creative ways of  working and involving men in communities of practice as active participants in shaping their own learning. The book has had multiple launches around the world, including three in the UK in February, Australia, New Zealand, Greece and Portugal and London in collaboration with Chapter authors.

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Expanding usability analysis with intrinsic motivation concepts to learn about CDSS adoption: A case study

Authors Published in Type Year
O’Sullivan, D., Doyle, J., Michalowski, W., Wilk, S., Thomas, R. and Farion, K. Journal of Health Policy and Technology Journal 2014

Despite many clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) being rated as highly usable, CDSSs have not been widely adopted in clinical practice. We posit that there are factors aside from usability that impact adoption of CDSSs; in particular we are interested in the role played by MDs intrinsic motivation to use computer-based support. Our research aim is to investigate the relationship between usability and intrinsic motivation in order to learn about adoption of CDSS in clinical practice.

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Designing a wellness self-management tool for older adults – Results from a field trial of YourWellness

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J., Walsh, L., Sassu, A. and McDonagh, T. Pervasive Health 2014 Conference 2014

It is recognized that empowering individuals to manage their own health and wellbeing will result in more cost-effective healthcare systems, improved health outcomes and will encourage healthy individuals to remain that way. With the advent of the quantified-self movement in recent years, there has been an increase in technology applications supporting wellness self-management. Such applications allow people to self-track and self-report, with many providing feedback. However, little research in this area has examined how best to support older adults in health self-management. This paper reports findings from a 5-month home deployment of YourWellness – an application that supports older adults in self-reporting on their wellbeing and provides feedback to promote positive wellbeing management. Our findings contribute to a greater understanding of older adults’ attitudes and behaviours in relation to wellbeing self-management that can facilitate the creation of new, personalized health and wellbeing interventions for this population.

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An integrated home-based self-management system to support the wellbeing of older adults

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J., Kealy, A., Loane, J., Walsh, L., O’Mullane, B., Flynn, C., MacFarlane, A., Bortz, B., Knapp, B and Bond, R. JAISE Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments Journal Paper 2014

With an ageing population and the constant need towards improving the quality of life for older people in our society, there comes an urgent challenge to support people where they live in an environment that adapts to their needs as they age. While much research on ubiquitous sensor systems and telehealth devices focuses on this need, many of these solutions operate at less than full capacity, and with little scope at present to assess everyday aspects of wellbeing. They focus on detecting sudden critical physiological and behavioural changes and offer few mechanisms to support preventative actions. The challenge of predicting changes and prompting positive preventa-tive intervention measures, aiding the avoidance of severe physical or mental harm, has not adequately been ad-dressed. This paper discusses our experiences of designing, deploying and testing an integrated home-based am-bient assisted living (AAL) system for older adults, consisting of ambient monitoring, behaviour recognition and feedback to support self-management of wellness, in addition to providing feedback on home security and home energy. It offers a complete system overview of an AAL solution in smart environments and discusses our lessons learned with the goal of assisting other researchers in the field in designing and deploying similar environments.

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Bridging the Chasm from research and innovation to sustainable socio-economic impact. Towards a Collaboration Platform to Improve the Exploitation of Assets from EU Funded R&D in Active and Healthy Ageing.

Authors Published in Type Year
Bond, R., Ceinos, C., Mountzi, V. Report of the EU HAIVISIO project. Report 2014

The HAIVISIO  project is aimed at enhancing the visibility and awareness of the results of existing e-Health, Active Ageing and Independent Living projects funded by the European Commission. HAIVISIO is centred on building a community of relevant projects and stakeholders, organised around adding value and enhancing the impact of their emerging good-practices and project assets. The goal is to improve the impact of well performing projects through sharing, synergy building and appropriate communications.

Derivation of night time behaviour metrics using ambient sensors

Authors Published in Type Year
Kealy, A., McDaid, K., Loane, J., Walsh, L. and Doyle, J. Pervasive Health 2013 Conference 2013

Sleep problems have been shown to have significant negative impact on health. As such it is important to examine night time behaviour to objectively determine when sleep disturbances arise. Due to the large night-to-night variability in sleep quality for older adults, it is important to objectively measure behaviour over a significant period to establish trends or changes in patterns of sleep. In this paper we present a means of ambiently monitoring sleep through the use of sensors installed in each of sixteen independent living apartments. We investigate the effect of time outside the home and movement within the home on sleep. These measures are validated against comparative measures from two actigraph datasets. The first consisting of five adults, two of whom are healthy subjects and the other three adults have previously fallen, gathered over a period of between two and four nights. The second consisting of three older adults recorded over seven nights in their own homes. Results relating time outside the home and movement within the home to sleep are presented for three individuals spanning a period of between 630 and 650 days.

Health and wellness self-management for older adults

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J., Walsh, L. and Sassu, A. CHI 2013 Workshop on Personal Informatics Conference 2013

This position paper describes our ongoing work in the design of health and wellness applications that support older adults in managing their wellbeing. Specifically, this involves older adults self-reporting on various aspects of their wellbeing and receiving feedback on such, to increase their awareness of their health and to support them in maintaining or returning to a healthy state of being. In designing this application, it was critical to involve older adults, to understand their attitudes towards wellness, as well as assessing the effectiveness of various types of input and feedback visualisations

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We were all the same age once” – Experiences of Intergenerational App Design

Authors Published in Type Year
Doyle, J., Sassu, A. and Mc Donagh, T. BCS HCI 2013 Conference 2013

SANDPiT is a novel intergenerational project whereby 40 school students and 12 older adults worked together over 9 months to design and prototype technology applications for mobile devices. The main remit of the project was to design applications that are of benefit to younger and older generations alike, focusing on the similarities between generations rather than the differences. This paper explores some of the successes and challenges of creating an intergenerational design team, highlighting issues surrounding collaboration, communication, engagement and mutual learning.

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Men’s sheds in Ireland, learning through community contexts

Authors Published in Type Year
Carragher, L Irish Men’s Sheds Association Report 2013

‘Men’s Sheds in Ireland; Learning through Community Contexts’, by Dr. Lucia Carragher of Dundalk IT. This research provides evidence on who is participating in Men’s Sheds in Ireland, and with what outcomes, and reports a clear improvement in health and wellbeing for the men who take part in Men’s Sheds in Ireland, relating primarily to increased social networks through taking part in a Men’s Shed. The report also indicates that “IMSA plays a significant role in supporting the development of Sheds in Ireland”.

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